Ropalomerid #1 (Willistoniella sp.)

Ropalomerid #1 (Willistoniella sp.)
This is a really odd little fly that looks like a cross between a sciomyzid (snail-killing fly) and a sarcophagid (flesh fly), which isn’t far from the truth because the family Ropalomeridae sits within the Infraorder Muscomorpha and the Superfamily Sciomyzoidea. The family is nearly entirely neotropical, with 1 of the 26 known species occuring ...

Syrphid #4 – Ceriogaster sp. (female) 1

Syrphid #4 - Ceriogaster sp. (female)
This is a lovely black hoverfly with metallic green patches. The specimen has been donated to Menno Reemer – many thanks to him for the identification.

Syrphid #1

Syrphid #1
This wasp mimic hoverfly looks very similar to Stratiomyid #7. This specimen has been donated to Menno Reemer.

Microdon (virgo-species group) (French Guiana) 3

Microdon (virgo-species group) (French Guiana)
This amazing metallic green hoverfly was in the first batch from French Guiana. Menno Reemer is currently revising the Microdontini so the name is only tentative and might be subject to change. EDIT (1/5/2011): Menno has this specimen and has confirmed that it is part of the virgo-species group.

Syrphid #3

Syrphid #3
Another wasp-mimic hoverfly. This specimen has been donated to Menno Reemer.

Syrphid #2 (Palpada cf. scutellaris) 1

Syrphid #2 (Palpada cf. scutellaris)
An interesting black hoverfly with a beautiful yellow scutellum and contrasting grey dusting patches. This specimen has been donated to Menno Reemer. Many thanks to Martin Hauser for the identification suggestion.

Stratiomyid #7 (Hermetia sp.) 1

Stratiomyid #7 (Hermetia sp.)
A wasp-mimic soldier-fly – very similar in form to this syrphid. This specimen has been donated to Martin Hauser – many thanks to him for the name suggestion.

Stratiomyid #6 (Hermetia illucens) 2

Stratiomyid #6 (Hermetia illucens)
An interesting soldier-fly that seems to be a wasp mimic. This specimen has been donated to Martin Hauser. An identification of Hermetia illucens has been suggested by Rui and I think he is correct, as this is a very common species in the tropics 🙂

Stratiomyid #5 (Hermetia pulchra Wiedemann, 1830) 1

Stratiomyid #5 (Hermetia pulchra Wiedemann, 1830)
This is the largest soldier-fly in the samples, having a 23mm body length. This specimen has been donated to Martin Hauser – thanks to him for the identification.

Stratiomyid #4 (Artemita hieroglyphica) 1

Stratiomyid #4 (Artemita hieroglyphica)
This soldier-fly, and variations on this pattern, were very common in the dry-season samples. This specimen has been donated to Martin Hauser – many thanks to him for the identification.

Stratiomyid #3 (Panacris sp.) 1

Stratiomyid #3 (Panacris sp.)
A lovely blue-green tinged soldier-fly. This specimen has been donated to Martin Hauser – many thanks to him for the name suggestion.

Stratiomyid #2 (Cyphomyia sp.) 1

Stratiomyid #2 (Cyphomyia sp.)
A soldier-fly with strongly shaded wings. This specimen has been donated to Martin Hauser – many thanks to him for the identification.

Stratiomyid #1

Stratiomyid #1
A lovely blue-tinged soldier-fly. This specimen has been donated to Martin Hauser.

Bombylid #2 (Lepidophora cf. acroleuca)

Bombylid #2 (Lepidophora cf. acroleuca)
This is the first bombylid from the second batch of French Guianan flies. It is most remarkable for being covered in scales and at first glance it looked quite similar to some large mosquitos! David Gibbs has provided a tentative identification of Lepidophora cf. acroleuca (female) but very little work has been done in French ...

Bombylid #1

Bombylid #1
This is a bombylid taken from the first French Guianan batch. This specimen has been donated to David Gibbs.

Tabanid #2 (Fidena sp., Scionini)

Tabanid #2 (Fidena sp., Scionini)
This one is a really nice, classic Pangoniinae with the long proboscis from the first batch of French Guianan flies. Keith Bayless has suggested that it is Fidena (Fidena) sp. from the tribe Scionini.

Acrocerid #3 (Philopota sp., Philopotinae) 2

Acrocerid #3 (Philopota sp., Philopotinae)
This is the third in my recent series of acrocerids – a smaller taxon with shaded wings – 6mm body length hunched over. Jorge Almeida says it looks like an Philopota sp. EDIT (20/2/2010): Jessica Gillung (Sao Paulo, Brazil) has been in touch with me to say that she is revising the genus Philopota and ...

Tabanid #1 (Fidena sp.)

Tabanid #1 (Fidena sp.)
Here is the largest and grandest tabanid I have found so far in the French Guianan samples. The body length is about 18mm. This one is destined to go to Theo Zeegers in Holland, who gets all my tabanids. Keith Bayless has suggested a genus of Fidena, in the tribe Scionini.

Acrocerid #2 (Lasia sp.) 1

Acrocerid #2 (Lasia sp.)
I originally thought that this fly was from the family Nemestrinidae but Eric Fisher has kindly corrected my and it is in fact an acrocerid – possibly of the genus Lasia. The body length is about 14mm and, as you can see, the proboscis is even longer than that! Lasia spp. are parasitoids of mygalomorph ...

Acrocerid #1 (cf. Ocnaea sp.)

Acrocerid #1 (cf. Ocnaea sp.)
Not a tachinid this time but a really lovely fly, which I think is from the family Acroceridae. The body length is about 11mm. Apparently all acrocerid larvae are parasitoids of spiders. Eric Fisher thinks it is possibly related to the nearctic genus Ocnaea.